Calm your mind with pelle’s soothing alt-electronica album, The Rest Is Noise

Hailing from Chennai, India, pelle is the independent beatmaker and producer behind the glorious sounds you’re about to hear in his debut album, The Rest Is Noise, release by Export Quality Records.

Divined from a sumptuous mix of organic and electronic sounds, this record touches on everything from hip-hop beats to Indian folk to bluesy jazz to chilled electronica to experimental production. What it ultimately creates is a universe that glistens with a vibrant vivacity beneath the bright sun of the album’s artwork, giving the impression of life captured in its purest essence.

The eight-track collection starts with ‘Rouse’, a cinematic opener that takes a delicate piano melody and mournful trumpet and infuses it with warm, glowing synths. It’s a very Nils Frahm moment and one that instantly drew us in. Next is ‘High Spirits’ which has a noticeable change of pace thanks to the chirpy acoustic instrument and looped prayer-like crowd calls. As the song progresses, pelle adds in other elements, piece-by-piece and so, we the listener, join him on the journey of building a track. Third on the album is ‘Gyp’, a wiry little number that puts the Asian influence front-and-centre but then bolsters that top-line with a thundering bass beat which unexpectedly drops out in exchange for a more melodic tone of light ticks and sparkling electronica.

We hit with midpoint with ‘pelle’s call (Reprise)’ which is a really warm yet pensive culmination of conversing brass and fluttering violins. From that moment of serenity, we’re awoken by the hungry noises of ‘Lizard Lunch’, a badass take on jazz-hop in which hot-stepping synths, unrelenting drums and a groovy bass line propels the listener towards some unknown end with a palpable sense of urgency. Sixth track ‘Talos’ keeps the intensity going, although we’ve departed the earthy realm for an extraterrestrial one where metallic backbeats fall in an experimental downpour; like mercury hitting glass.

We approach the end of The Rest Is Noise with the answer to ‘pelle’s call’, the penultimate track ‘pelle’s fall’ in which a mournful melody contrasts with aggressive percussion. It feels the most unfinished of all the tracks, but there’s something really exciting in that open-endedness. And at last, we’ve reached the finale, suitably titled ‘The Rest Is Noise’ and also the album’s longest track at 3 minutes and 33 seconds. This one has a mystical aura to it, with faraway vocals coming in through those familiar sparkling synths and bubbling noises that evoke visions of water and fluidity. We continue in a marching rhythm through this liquid production for two minutes until we hit a lull in energy, in which darker sounds take over. This orchestral swell with subtle bass and alert snare drum, act like the soundtrack to the closing scene of an immense film, one that lets you know it’s the end, but there’s definitely a sequel in store.

So there you have it, our take on what can only be described as a brilliant piece of work from a highly promising talent. We can’t wait to see pelle grow and develop.

“End of a chapter/era? I’ve been sitting on this album for over 6 months now and I don’t take this long to put stuff out ever. I usually just put songs out on SoundCloud as soon as it’s done and work on new music. Now that this is out, I can focus on making more music. All my tracks are made in a single sitting, as I find that I lose track when I think about it too much. Say for instance I start working on a track, right? And can’t seem to finish it for some reason? I just start working on a new track. Cause when I overthink I don’t usually get good ideas so yeah.”

Follow pelle on Instagram.

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